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Success Stories
   

Attorney John Cayer

Attorney Stephanie Dyson
 

Cayer Dyson Law, P.C. offers the highest level of representation to its clients. As our client reviews demonstrate, clients are thoroughly satisfied with and extremely grateful for the level of knowledge and service which Cayer Dyson Law provides to its clients.

Below are some examples of recent successes which Cayer Dyson Law has achieved on behalf of its clients.

 
Case Types  
Immigration Detainees Aliens Applying for Visas at U.S. Consulates Abroad, Including Aliens Applying for Waivers of Grounds of Inadmissibility (Consular Processing)
Aliens in Removal (Deportation) Proceedings Applicants for Citizenship/Naturalization
Applicants for Family-Based Green Cards Applicants for Green Card Renewals
Applicants for Green Cards under Special Legislative Programs Basic Case Assessments
Immigration Detainees
A Lebanese citizen with a valid B-2 visitor visa was denied admission and detained upon his first attempted entry to the United States. During the airport screening process, he was asked a series of questions through a French interpreter which led to confusion in the case about whether he had a "credible fear" of returning to Lebanon. He was held in an immigration detention center (in other words, a jail) for the credible fear process for several weeks during which Cayer Dyson Law navigated between many different offices of the Department of Homeland Security - Enforcement and Removal, the Office of Chief Counsel, and the Asylum Office - to determine the status of the client's case and to retract his credible fear claim, as the client wished to return to Lebanon immediately. Fortunately, after many phone-calls, Cayer Dyson Law was able to unlock the client's case from the bureaucratic tangle, and the client was returned to Lebanon.

A Haitian citizen, who was a green card holder for about 10 years who had lived in the United States about 20 years, was taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement following a conviction for violation of a protective order and domestic assaults involving both current and former spouses. Unfortunately, because the offense involving violation of the protective order was so recent, the Immigration Judge denied the client's request for a bond after finding that the client was a danger to the community. Because cases involving detainees are "fast-tracked," it was particularly difficult to obtain all of the evidence needed for the client's case in the short window (about 45 days) between the scheduling of the hearing and the individual hearing. Cayer Dyson Law vigorously defended the client's case by applying for cancellation of removal for green card holders, and asylum as a criminal deportee to Haiti who would be subject to torture in Haitian jails. Cayer Dyson Law contacted the client's ex-wife who provided an Affidavit that she did not fear the client. Cayer Dyson Law also contacted the client's estranged spouse who provided extremely compelling testimony for the case. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's aggressive representation, the Judge granted the client's application for cancellation of removal, and the Government attorney did not appeal. The client, his family and friends were overjoyed with the result. The client now looks forward to applying for his citizenship in a few years.

Two Ecuadorian citizens were taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement due to pending criminal charges. One of the clients had been living in the United States for 14 years, the other for almost 10 years. Both clients had U.S. citizen children. Cayer Dyson Law successfully argued that both should be released on bond because one was eligible for cancellation of removal for non-permanent residents, while the other was eligible for repapering or voluntary departure. As a result of Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy, the clients were released on bonds of $4,000 and $7,500, respectively.

A Haitian citizen was taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement at his home after coming to the attention of immigration authorities. Notwithstanding the client's convictions for violation of a restraining order and unlicensed possession of a firearm, Cayer Dyson Law was successfully able to argue for his release on bond in the amount of $3,500.

A Colombian citizen was taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement after being released on bail from a recent arrest for drug trafficking. The client had no prior criminal convictions, and only one prior arrest for driving with a suspended license. Despite the very serious nature of the pending criminal proceedings, Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully advocate that the client was not a flight risk and not a danger to the community. The Immigration Judge set the client's bond at $4,000 to secure his release from custody pending the outcome of his removal case.

A Haitian citizen was taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement after he was released from state custody on a criminal charge. After gathering all of the client's criminal records, Cayer Dyson Law determined that Immigration and Customs Enforcement had improperly detained the client for over 3 weeks - the client had a green card and was not deportable. Cayer Dyson Law successfully advocated for the client's release, after which the client was happily reunited with his family.

A Mexican citizen was taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement after police stopped and inspected his company vehicle and found that he was present in the United States illegally. Cayer Dyson Law successfully argued in support of his release on bond from immigration custody pending the outcome of his immigration hearing.

A Guatemalan asylum seeker was taken into custody when she presented false immigration documents upon her arrival into the United States. Cayer Dyson Law represented the client for her credible fear interview. Based on the successful results of the interview, the client was released from immigration detention and was reunited with her family.
Aliens in Removal (Deportation) Proceedings
A Pakistani citizen was held in ICE custody for 1 year while ICE tried, but was unable to obtain a valid travel document. After ICE released the client on an Order of Supervision, the client retained Cayer Dyson Law to request a joint motion to reopen from the Department of Homeland Security Trial Attorney Unit, based on his marriage to a U.S. citizen and an approved I-130 petition. After months of waiting, the client and his U.S. citizen wife were ecstatic to find out that their joint motion request was approved, so that the Immigration Judge reopened the client's removal proceedings. After that, the client filed an I-485 application and I-601 application to waive the respondent's minimal criminal history. When the Immigration Judge gave the client a hearing date 4 years in the future, Cayer Dyson Law was again able to contact the Department of Homeland Security to request that the proceedings be terminated, and the I-485 and I-601 applications be sent to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for adjudication. About 1 year later, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case after a long struggle that was well worth it! The client will now be able to travel back to Pakistan to visit with his children there after a long and heartbreaking wait.
A Haitian citizen, who was a green card holder for almost 25 years in the United States, consulted with Cayer Dyson Law, P.C. after being stopped by immigration officials at the airport upon his return from Haiti due to a 15-year old conviction. Because the client moved from his address in the interim, he never received the notice of his immigration hearing. Immigration officials came to the client’s house and detained the client because the client had a removal order for failing to appear at his removal hearing. The client retained Cayer Dyson Law, P.C. to reopen the case for the client to pursue cancellation of removal for green card holders. Cayer Dyson Law, P.C. convinced the Immigration Judge that the client did not have adequate notice of his hearing. As a result, the Immigration Judge reopened the client’s case, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement released the respondent on a bond while his immigration proceedings were pending. After a 2½-year wait, the client appeared for his hearing in front of the Immigration Judge, and was fortunate that the Immigration Judge granted his case after considering all of the evidence which Cayer Dyson Law, P.C. put together for the client. The client will now be immediately eligible for naturalization as he has almost 25 years as a green card holder, more than 5 years of good moral character, and no criminal bars to his naturalization case. Once the client receives his U.S. citizenship, he will be able to petition to bring his child from Haiti.
A citizen of El Salvador was taken into immigration custody after immigration officials determined that he was likely a member of an El Salvadoran gang. Fortunately, the Immigration Judge found otherwise, and agreed to release the client on a $1,500 bond due to his minimal criminal history. After that, Cayer Dyson Law worked zealously to reinstate the client's Temporary Protected Status ("TPS") that had lapsed because the client was the victim of a notario who had mishandled the client's paperwork. Thereafter, Cayer Dyson Law was able to obtain a travel document through TPS that allowed the client to leave and re-enter the United States to cure his prior entry without a visa. After 4 years of a long struggle, Cayer Dyson Law managed to obtain the client's permanent residence in the United States - the client was overjoyed to find that he was finally granted a green card through his U.S. citizen wife after years in the United States, and that he would be able to remain here with his U.S. citizen wife and two U.S. citizen children..
A citizen of Trinidad was taken into immigration custody following a criminal arrest. Fortunately, Cayer Dyson Law was able to convince the Immigration Judge to release the client on a $3,000 bond, despite the fact that the client had an open criminal case. After the client was released on bond, he was able to clear up his criminal case, which the criminal court eventually dismissed. Cayer Dyson Law carefully assessed the case and determined that the client, who was 26 years old, qualified as a child for immigration purposes under the Child Status Protection Act (“CSPA”) to adjust his status, based on the I-130 immediate relative petition which his U.S. citizen stepmother had filed on his behalf many years earlier. Two years after the Immigration Judge granted the petitioner’s release from immigration custody, the Immigration Judge granted his application for adjustment of status, despite the fact that the client had two criminal cases that had been dismissed. Cayer Dyson Law’s successful advocacy helped to secure the client’s release from custody, and to ultimately win the client’s case.
A Nigerian citizen and her two children retained Cayer Dyson Law after being placed in removal proceedings for suspected marriage fraud. The family was very fortunate that a rarely-used provision of law - INA § 237(a)(1)(H) - allowed them to waive their misrepresentations in connection with their green cards as a matter of discretion. Because three of the other children in the family were U.S. citizens with severe medical issues, the Immigration Judge granted their cases, despite the seriousness of their misrepresentations.
A Haitian citizen, who was released on bond by an Immigration Judge while his case was pending, sought "cancellation of removal" before the Immigration Court as a green card holder who had lived in the United States for many years. The client had a number of criminal convictions, including an offense for possession of a firearm from a number of years ago. Despite the seriousness of the client's criminal history, Cayer Dyson Law argued that the client was rehabilitated, that he deserved to stay in the United States with his U.S. citizen spouse and children, and that his deportation to Haiti would cause him and his family considerable emotional and financial hardship. After a 4-year battle, Cayer Dyson Law, the client and his family were all thrilled with the outcome of the case.
A Vietnamese citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after he was denaturalized for misrepresenting his criminal history on a naturalization application. As a result of the denaturalization process, the client returned to being a green card holder based on his prior refugee status, but was deportable due to his criminal history. Because the client was married to a U.S. citizen, the client was eligible for a new green card through his marriage. After a 7-year battle which included retaining a criminal attorney to vacate some of the criminal convictions which made the client ineligible for a new green card, Cayer Dyson Law won the client's adjustment of status case with waivers under INA §§ 212(h) (for certain criminal history) and (i) (for fraud). This case was a real triumph for Cayer Dyson Law, the client and his family.
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after she married a U.S. citizen. She knew that she had problems in the past with immigration, but was unaware that she had a deportation order. Cayer Dyson Law investigated the case further and determined that she had been granted voluntary departure by an Immigration Judge. While Cayer Dyson Law was working on the case, the earthquake occurred in Haiti. As a result, the client became eligible for, applied for and was granted Temporary Protected Status ("TPS") as a Haitian citizen. Cayer Dyson Law was able to use the client's approved TPS as a basis to reopen the case, arguing that the client could not be deported based on her approved TPS. Eventually, after the Immigration Judge heard the client's application for adjustment of status based on her marriage to a U.S. citizen, the Immigration Judge approved the case and granted the client her green card. The client was overjoyed.
A Ugandan citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law in connection with her removal proceedings. The client had been placed into removal proceedings after the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services denied the I-751 waiver to remove the conditions on her residence based on good faith/divorce which she had filed on her own. After Cayer Dyson Law reviewed the case, it became evident that the client had insufficient evidence of the good faith nature of her marriage. As a result, Cayer Dyson Law determined that the best avenue for the case would be to re-file the I-751 waiver based on extreme hardship. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the I-751 waiver based on extreme hardship at an interview at the local office. Following approval of the I-751 waiver, the Immigration Judge terminated the client's removal proceedings.
A Romanian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after being placed in removal proceedings due to alleged marriage fraud, in connection with a prior marriage to a U.S. citizen which had been annulled. Immigration and Customs Enforcement had a signed statement from the former U.S. citizen spouse alleging marriage fraud. The Romanian client was recently married to a U.S. citizen and wished to pursue a green card on that basis. However, a certain section of the law [(INA § 204(c)] bars aliens from adjusting status if they have previously conspired to enter into a marriage to obtain immigration benefits. Through Cayer Dyson Law's zealous advocacy, Cayer Dyson Law convinced the Immigration Court to terminate the client's removal proceedings, and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services eventually approved the case after reviewing the arguments and evidence which Cayer Dyson Law presented on the client's behalf.
A Nigerian family retained Cayer Dyson Law after being placed in removal proceedings on a denied entry to Canada to seek asylum. The family sought asylum as a defense to deportation before the Immigration Court. Unfortunately, they filed their application outside of the one-year window for asylum claims, which made their case much more difficult because they had to prove extraordinary circumstances for filing the application 5 1/2 years after their arrival to the United States. Due to the escalating violence in Nigeria, which frequently is connected to ethnic and religious ties, Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully convince the Court that the family would suffer persecution if they returned to Nigeria. After winning their case, because the government attorney for the Department of Homeland Security waived appeal, this family was finally able to put their 8-year struggle with their immigration status aside to plan for a bright future in the United States.
A Chinese citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law in connection with an asylum application which the Asylum Office had referred to the Court. The asylum application was based on a fear of persecution of returning to China due to the client's practice of Falun Gong, anti-Communist political activities, and conversion to the Christian religion. The client also had not met the one-year deadline for asylum. After Cayer Dyson Law took over the case, Cayer Dyson Law filed substantial evidence in support of the client's fear of persecution, and evidence to support a finding that the client missed the one-year deadline due to exceptional circumstances. Winning the asylum case was particularly important for the client - although he had a U.S. citizen wife and child, he was nevertheless ineligible to adjust his status through his U.S. citizen wife in the United States because he had entered without inspection. Needless to say, everyone was thrilled with the Immigration Judge's grant of asylum, and the fact that the government attorney for the Department of Homeland Security waived appeal.
A Nepalese citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after he was referred for removal proceedings before the Immigration Court in connection with an affirmative asylum application he had filed with the Asylum Office. After discussing the matter with the client, Cayer Dyson Law determined that the client was in valid F-1 status as a student, and that the asylum application had been incorrectly referred to the Court. After Cayer Dyson Law filed a motion to terminate the removal proceedings with the Court, and after the government attorney for the Department of Homeland Security determined that the client's position was correct, the Court terminated the removal proceedings at the first hearing. The client was relieved to have his immigration status returned to normal.
A Nepalese citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after her asylum case was referred to the Immigration Court because she had not filed for asylum within one year of her arrival to the United States. Cayer Dyson Law was able to convince the Court that the reason for the delay was due the fact that she had been in valid immigration status prior to her divorce, and that the emotional distress from the divorce contributed to the delay. Furthermore, with Cayer Dyson Law's effective representation, the client was able to prove to the Court that she would suffer persecution if she returned to Nepal on account of the Maoists and her political participation in the RPP (a political party in Nepal). The case was so strong that the government attorney for the Department of Homeland Security declined to cross-examine the client, and waived appeal. The client was overjoyed with the result.
A Moroccan citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after the Board of Immigration Appeals dismissed his appeal of an Immigration Judge's decision denying his application for VAWA cancellation of removal. As luck would have it, only several weeks earlier, the Board of Immigration Appeals had issued its decision in Matter of Sesay, allowing certain K-1 fiance entrants to adjust their status notwithstanding a divorce from the U.S. citizen petitioner, so long as the couple married within 90 days of the K-1 fiance's entrance to the United States. The client's case fit this fact pattern perfectly, so Cayer Dyson Law quickly filed a motion to reopen with the Board of Immigration Appeals requesting reopening under Matter of Sesay for adjustment of status. Fortunately, the Board of Immigration Appeals reopened the case for the client to pursue adjustment of status. Before the Immigration Judge, Cayer Dyson Law argued that the client had not committed fraud in the underlying proceedings in connection with the Immigration Judge's finding of a lack of credibility with respect to the client's prior testimony. Further, Cayer Dyson Law argued that the client deserved a green card despite the existence of two criminal convictions (Assault & Battery) involving the client's ex-spouse. Finally, after a long battle, and 10 years after the client's initial entrance to the United States in K-1 status, the Immigration Judge approved the case and granted the client a green card. Both Cayer Dyson Law and the client were overjoyed with the results!
A Moldovan citizen and his wife retained Cayer Dyson Law after their affirmative I-589 application for asylum in the United States was referred to the Immigration Court by the Asylum Office due the Asylum Office's finding that the client lacked credibility. The clients feared persecution in Moldova due to their political affiliation and their membership in the Roma ethnic group. Cayer Dyson Law used the services of an expert witness to prove that the client was a member of the Roma ethnic group. Cayer Dyson Law also put together numerous background materials to prove that the client's fear of returning to Moldova was reasonable and credible. After 3 1/2 years of working on the case, Cayer Dyson Law eventually secured a victory before the Immigration Court.
An Ecuadorian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after he was picked up by immigration officials on a rural road in Vermont. The client entered the United States on a K-1 fiance visa, but did not marry his U.S. citizen fiance within 90 days in accordance with the visa. However, he was still in a relationship with the K-1 petitioner, still living with her and still very much in love with her. The clients went to one attorney who told them there was no hope for the case because they had not married within the 90-day window, so they did nothing about the situation until the client was picked up by immigration officials. Then, they came to Cayer Dyson Law who reviewed the situation, and found that the prior attorney was incorrect. The couple married right away, and the green card was approved.
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after she was stopped by immigration officials on a return trip from Haiti. She had been a lawful permanent resident in the United States for over 20 years, but was placed in removal proceedings for certain criminal offenses which made her "inadmissible" to the United States. After reviewing the case, Cayer Dyson Law determined that she was eligible for cancellation of removal for permanent residents which allows green card holders who meet certain criteria to remain in the United States if they can prove that they deserve to stay here, notwithstanding their criminal offenses. Unfortunately, the client was unable to prevail before the Immigration Judge, so the case went to the Board of Immigration Appeals, which dismissed the appeal. During this time, Cayer Dyson Law had not given up hope for the case as she had encouraged the client to hire a criminal attorney to seek "post-conviction relief" on the criminal matters. While all of this was going on, the client had a stroke, so Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully reopen the client's case based on new medical evidence and evidence of the pending post-conviction motions. Fortunately, by the time the case went back to the Immigration Judge, the client's criminal attorney had prevailed in criminal court in vacating the client's criminal cases forming the basis of the Government's charges of removability against the client. As a result, Cayer Dyson Law was able to file a motion to terminate the client's case, which was successful. The client now intends to pursue her naturalization case as it has been 5 years since her last criminal offense. She will be happy to put her immigration nightmare behind her!!
A Chinese citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after she married a U.S. citizen and wanted to pursue a green card application before the Boston Immigration Court. Her case was complicated by the fact that she had a pending asylum claim, had submitted some questionable documents in connection with her application for a visitor visa before the U.S. Consulate in China, and that she had previously been arrested for drug trafficking, though the case against her was never prosecuted. Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully advocate that the client had never been involved in drug trafficking, and so that there was no reason to deny her the green card (a green card can be denied even where the Government has only a suspicion that someone has been involved in drug trafficking, even where there is no conviction). The couple was thrilled when the case was approved in a relatively short amount of time.
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after being put in removal proceedings following a routine traffic stop, and after having filed an application for adjustment of status (a green card) through his U.S. citizen wife. After Cayer Dyson Law reviewed the client's documents, it determined that the client had not properly completed the appropriate paperwork, in that he should have filed the application with the Immigration Court, rather than with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully convince the Trial Attorney Unit and Boston Immigration Court to terminate the removal proceedings so that the client could pursue his adjustment case before the New York office of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Because the client had improperly handled the case from the start, and had done multiple filings through a "notario" who was unauthorized to practice law, his case was particularly difficult to push through the process. Eventually, 4 1/2 years after filing and after Cayer Dyson Law involved Senator Gillibrand's office in New York, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case. The moral of the story is - please hire a lawyer for your immigration case!!! Sadly, this client missed his father's funeral in Haiti due to the delays in this case.
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after an Immigration Judge denied his request for additional time to put together his case, and entered a removal order against him. Cayer Dyson Law appealed the denial of the continuance to give the client more time to strategize the best possible route for the case. As it turned out, the client had been subjected to domestic violence at the hands of his U.S. citizen wife. Cayer Dyson Law prepared an I-360 petition requesting classification of the client as the abused spouse of a U.S. citizen. It was particularly difficult to prove the abuse because the client was male (typically, many I-360 petitions are filed by females), and the client did not have any of his identifying documents to prove a good faith marriage with his U.S. citizen wife. After two years, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services eventually approved the I-360 petition which enabled the client to pursue an application for adjustment of status (a green card) in front of the Immigration Judge. Both Cayer Dyson Law and the client were overjoyed that the case turned out so well after three years of hard work.
Bulgarian citizens retained Cayer Dyson Law in connection with an asylum claim involving decades of harrassment and abuse in Bulgaria. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy, the Immigration Judge found that the clients would suffer persecution if they returned to Bulgaria, and granted them asylum. Following the approval of the couple's case, Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully obtain the approval of the couple's son's asylum case before the Asylum Office of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
A Canadian citizen/U.S. green card holder retained Cayer Dyson Law after being stopped by immigration authorities on his way back from Canada, where he had traveled for the weekend to attend the funeral of a relative. Immigration authorities placed the client in removal proceedings due to several convictions (including domestic assault & battery) over a decade old. Because the client had been a U.S. green card holder for over 46 years, and had been to Canada previously for short trips without any problem, it came as quite a shock to the client that immigration authorities had the power to suddenly question his right to remain in the United States. After careful review of the client's case, Cayer Dyson Law determined that the client qualified for several forms of relief, including cancellation of removal for green card holders. Cayer Dyson Law urged the client to contact his ex-wife and children to testify and submit written statements in support of his case. After hearing the testimony of the client's ex-wife, and the other strong evidence which Cayer Dyson Law submitted in support of the case, the Immigration Judge found that the client had established eligibility for cancellation of removal as a matter of discretion. Cayer Dyson Law provided such a vigorous defense for the client that the Trial Attorney (prosecuting attorney for the Department of Homeland Security) declined to appeal the decision to the Board of Immigration Appeals. After a 3-year struggle with his immigration issues, the client will now be allowed to remain in the United States with his numerous family members and will soon be pursuing an application for U.S. citizenship.
A Colombian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after separating from her U.S. citizen spouse due to abuse. Cayer Dyson Law filed an I-360 petition seeking benefits for her client as the battered spouse of a U.S. citizen. After USCIS approved the petition, the client was able to adjust her status to receive her green card from the Immigration Judge.
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law for an asylum case. Halfway through the process, the strategy for the case changed after the client married a U.S. citizen, who petitioned for the client to receive a green card. The case was particularly difficult because the client had a criminal record involving many arrests, including a domestic violence case with his ex-wife. Because this conviction was a "crime involving moral turpitude," the client needed to submit a 212(h) waiver in addition to his application for adjustment of status. Cayer Dyson Law successfully advocated that the client's U.S. citizen wife and 2 U.S. citizen children would suffer extreme hardship if he were deported to Haiti. Cayer Dyson Law also demonstrated that the client was sorry for his past behavior, and that he had turned his life around (5 years with no criminal incidents). As a result, the Judge approved the case, and the Trial Attorneys did not appeal the decision.
A Venezuelan citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law for representation in removal proceedings after his adjustment (green card) application was denied by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services alleged that the client was ineligible for a green card because he failed to prove that he had a good faith marriage. Subsequently, the client divorced his wife and married someone else, who also happened to be a U.S. citizen. Cayer Dyson Law successfully petitioned the court to close the client's removal proceedings so that the client could receive his green card from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services eventually approved the case, after Cayer Dyson Law successfully argued that the prior marriage was not fraudulent, and that the client's criminal arrests did not bar him from receiving a green card.
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law after she was apprehended by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The client had filed for a green card and attended an adjustment (green card) interview without an attorney. At that time of her interview, she was not allowed to complete the interview because she had an outstanding order of deportation. After the client retained Cayer Dyson Law, Cayer Dyson Law determined that it would be very difficult, if not impossible to reopen the client's deportation case because two prior attorneys had tried but failed, and because the client had overstayed a period of voluntary departure (meaning that the client was barred for 10 years from adjusting status in the United States). While Cayer Dyson Law was working on the case, the client's U.S. citizen husband passed away from laryngeal cancer, further complicating the case. Eventually, after much hard work and legal analysis, Cayer Dyson Law found a loophole in the written voluntary departure order which allowed the firm to successfully petition the Immigration Judge to reopen the client's case. Once the Immigration Judge reopened the client's case, Cayer Dyson Law successfully represented the client for her green card application, which was processed because the client qualified as a widower of a U.S. citizen.
A Chinese client retained Cayer Dyson Law for representation in removal proceedings after the Asylum Office referred his asylum application to the Immigration Court for review. After consulting with the client, Cayer Dyson Law determined that the best strategy for the case would be to apply for cancellation of removal for non-permanent residents, with the asylum case as a backup form of relief from removal. Cayer Dyson Law was able to put together a successful case for cancellation of removal; the Firm demonstrated that the client's U.S. citizen children would suffer "exceptional and extremely unusual hardship" if the client were removed to China. Because this standard of hardship is so high, we were particularly pleased when the Immigration Judge approved the case.
An Indonesian citizen came to Cayer Dyson Law for assistance after being placed in removal proceedings. With the assistance of Cayer Dyson Law, he filed an application for asylum. While his case was pending at the Immigration Court, he fell in love with a U.S. citizen and married her. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy, the Immigration Judge terminated the client's removal proceedings so that he could receive his green card before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Ultimately, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case.
A Liberian citizen applied for a green card through his U.S. citizen wife after living in the United States for many years. Because the client had criminal convictions which made him "inadmissible" to the United States, the only way he could qualify for a green card was if he submitted a "212(h) waiver" demonstrating extreme hardship to his U.S. citizen wife and children if he were deported. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's thorough preparation of the case, the Judge found that the client had met the standard for the approval of a 212(h) waiver, and approved the client's application for adjustment of status.
A Bulgarian citizen applied for asylum in the United States, claiming that he had suffered past persecution in Bulgaria on account of his Roma ethnicity. An Asylum Officer referred his case to the Immigration Judge, at which time the client retained Cayer Dyson Law for assistance with his case. One of the central issues in the case was whether the client was in fact a Roma. Through the use of expert testimony and other supporting documentary evidence, Cayer Dyson Law successfully convinced the Immigration Judge that the client was indeed a Roma. Based on this finding, and his finding that the client had suffered past persecution and could show a well-founded fear of persecution if he returned to Bulgaria, the Immigration Judge approved the case.
An 18-year old citizen of Trinidad and Tobago and her U.S. citizen mother came to Cayer Dyson Law for assistance after discovering a removal order for failing to appear at an Immigration Court hearing. Cayer Dyson Law convinced the Department of Homeland Security to submit a joint motion to reopen the removal proceedings to the Immigration Judge, which he granted. After the Immigration Judge reopened the case, the client received her green card through her U.S. citizen mother.
A Somali asylum seeker sought the assistance of Cayer Dyson Law when her asylum case was referred to an Immigration Judge for removal proceedings. In removal proceedings, the client claimed that she had suffered past persecution in Somalia, through being raped and tortured on account of her tribal membership. Because the client was experiencing severe memory loss concerning the events which she had suffered in Somalia, Cayer Dyson Law arranged for a psychological evaluation, as a result of which the client was diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Ongoing Stress Disorder. Cayer Dyson Law used this evidence to show the reason for the client's failure to file for asylum within one year of her entry to the United States, and to support the overall credibility of her claim. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's persistence with the case, the Immigration Judge granted asylum to the client.
A Guatemalan citizen was placed in removal proceedings after his asylum application was referred to an Immigration Judge for review. At the same time, this client's application for adjustment of status, based on a marriage to a U.S. citizen, was pending before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services could not approve the adjustment application due to the pending removal proceedings. Cayer Dyson Law contacted the Trial Attorney Unit of the Department of Homeland Security, which agreed to join in a motion to terminate the removal proceedings before the Immigration Court. Subsequently, the Immigration Court granted our motion to terminate the removal proceedings. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's success in having the removal proceedings terminated, the client is now able to receive his green card before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
A Guatemalan citizen sought asylum before the Immigration Judge, asserting that she had been raped, physically assaulted, and received death threats at the hands of her father. Given that domestic violence and gender-based claims are an evolving area of immigration law, Cayer Dyson Law’s victory in this case was a significant achievement.
A husband and wife from China applied for asylum before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services based on their resistance to the coercive population control policies in China. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services referred their application to the Immigration Judge for review. Cayer Dyson Law effectively questioned the witnesses before the Immigration Judge to establish the credibility of their claim. The Immigration Judge granted the case.
A Haitian asylum seeker married a U.S. citizen while he was in removal proceedings before the U.S. Immigration Court. Cayer Dyson Law advocated to the Court that the client’s application for a green card through his marriage should be considered. The Court granted the case.
A green card holder from Haiti was placed in removal proceedings before the U.S. Immigration Court due to his criminal record. Due to Cayer Dyson Law’s aggressive representation, the Immigration Court closed the case and the client received back his green card.
A Haitian citizen had a final order of deportation based on his failure to appear for an immigration hearing. Cayer Dyson Law submitted a motion to the Immigration Court to ask that the client’s case be reopened. Because the Court granted the motion, the client will now be able to apply for a green card through his U.S. citizen wife.
A Haitian asylum seeker had a final order of deportation based on his failure to appear for an immigration hearing. Cayer Dyson Law submitted a motion to the Immigration Court asking that the client’s case be reopened for the client to pursue his asylum application. The Court agreed to reopen the case.
Applicants for Family-Based Green Cards
A Haitian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law to file an I-751 petition to remove the conditions on his residence. Unfortunately, he did not have enough evidence to prove the good faith nature of his marriage that had ended in divorce, in order to file an I-751 waiver based on a good faith marriage and subsequent divorce. As a result, Cayer Dyson Law prepared an I-751 waiver package based on the client's extreme hardship if the case were denied. The package included evidence that the client would be unable to obtain medical treatment for his diabetes condition if he returned to Haiti. The client and Cayer Dyson Law were ecstatic to learn that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case, and that the client will be able to remain in the United States indefinitely as a green card holder.
A U.S. citizen daughter petitioned for her father, a citizen of Uruguay, to obtain a green card in the United States. Unfortunately, the case was not well-prepared by their prior lawyer, and as a result, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services denied the case. Specifically, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services alleged that the client needed an I-601 waiver to overcome fraud at his immigration interview by failing to disclose a prior entry to the United States, and a waiver to overcome the unlawful presence bar due to a prior period of unlawful presence in the United States. After Cayer Dyson Law took over the case, Cayer Dyson Law filed a motion to reconsider the denial of the I-601 waiver on the client's behalf. Cayer Dyson Law argued that the client was not subject to the unlawful presence bar. After considering Cayer Dyson Law's arguments, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services agreed that the unlawful presence bar did not apply, and determined that the client had not in fact committed fraud, so that the I-601 waiver was unnecessary. Thereafter, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case.
A U.S. citizen and his Canadian spouse retained Cayer Dyson Law to handle their immigration case. They were very worried about applying for a green card because the Canadian spouse had lived in the United States as a child, during which time her parents had failed to disclose to U.S. immigration officials that she was a Canadian citizen when obtaining Temporary Protected Status ("TPS") as a Somali citizen. Cayer Dyson Law determined that the best approach would be to fully disclose this issue to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. At the green card interview, under the careful guidance of Cayer Dyson Law, the client admitted to the immigration officer that she had this issue with her case. Because Cayer Dyson Law successfully argued that the client was only a minor at the time, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services did not require an I-601 waiver for fraud. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case based on its finding that, notwithstanding this issue, the client deserved a green card.
A U.S. citizen and her El Salvadoran husband retained Cayer Dyson Law to handle their immigration process. They were particularly concerned about their case because the El Salvadoran client had previously misrepresented his date and manner of entry when applying for an immigration benefit - Temporary Protected Status for El Salvadorans. The couple was married for almost 4 years before they approached an immigration attorney to straighten out their problems. After reviewing their case, Cayer Dyson Law determined that the best way to proceed was to "come clean" with immigration regarding the misrepresentation by filing an I-601 waiver to overcome the fraud. As part of the waiver, the El Salvadoran client had to show "extreme hardship" to his U.S. citizen wife if he were denied a green card. The couple was very nervous about their case but Cayer Dyson Law stood by them every step of the way, and put together a persuasive package for the I-601 waiver. The couple's case was approved without any problems due to Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy.
A U.S. citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law for assistance with the immigration case of his Haitian niece, over whom he had full guardianship. Cayer Dyson Law immediately noticed that the child had the opportunity to qualify for a green card if the family decided to adopt the child before she turned 16. Cayer Dyson Law coordinated with a family law attorney to finalize the adoption. Finally, one day before the child's 16th birthday, the adoption was approved. Without Cayer Dyson Law's persistence in communicating with the family law attorney, the adoption would never have been approved in time to confer an immigration benefit. Once the adoptive father had guardianship for 2 years and the adoption was finalized, Cayer Dyson Law was able to proceed with the immigration portion of the case. Eventually, the green card was approved.
An Indian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law for assistance with filing an I-751 petition requesting a waiver of the joint filing requirement based on his divorce from his U.S. citizen wife and his good faith marriage. He was very worried about the case because his marriage fell apart not long after his green card interview, which USCIS typically considers to be indicative of fraud in connection with the marriage. Fortunately, the client had a wealth of supporting documentation of the good faith nature of his marriage. Through Cayer Dyson Law's effective representation and organization of the supporting evidence, USCIS approved the I-751 waiver without an interview.
A Vietnamese citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law for assistance with filing an I-751 petition to remove the conditions on her residence. She had received her green card through her U.S. citizen spouse in Vietnam, however, the marriage later fell apart. Because the client had difficulty obtaining a divorce, Cayer Dyson Law advised the client to file an I-751 petition requesting an "extreme hardship" waiver of the joint filing requirement. By filing the extreme hardship waiver, the client was able to avoid the termination of her conditional permanent resident status while she sought a final divorce from her U.S. citizen husband. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's effective representation, USCIS determined that the client would suffer extreme hardship if she were deported to Vietnam, and approved the I-751 waiver based on extreme hardship.
Because he was over 21 years old at the time that his father's employment-based green card was approved, a Brazilian did not receive his green card with the rest of his family. Later in life, he married a U.S. citizen but had difficulty receiving his green card because he entered with a fake visa which was no longer in his possession. As a result, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services requested a "waiver" for the fraudulent entry. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy for this case, the client eventually received his green card.
A U.S. citizen grandmother adopted her 14-year old grandson, from Trinidad, and subsequently filed immigration paperwork on his behalf through Cayer Dyson Law. Although immigration laws allow U.S. citizens to petition for adopted children if certain requirements are met, the law imposes tight restrictions on whether a U.S. citizen can sponsor an adopted relative for permanent residence. After a long process, the case was approved.
A Georgian citizen and his U.S. citizen wife submitted the paperwork for a green card without an attorney. 6½ years later, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services still had not issued a decision on the case. The situation was dire because the marriage had fallen apart and the couple wished to divorce, but the U.S. citizen did not want to jeopardize her husband’s immigration status. They hired Cayer Dyson Law to obtain a final resolution to the case. 7½ years after they had initially filed the case, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services finally issued an approval.
A Colombian citizen received conditional permanent resident status through her marriage to a U.S. citizen. With her husband, she filed the Form I-751 (Petition to Remove the Conditions on Residence) to remove the conditions on her residence. Subsequently, the marriage fell apart before the approval of the Petition. Cayer Dyson Law filed a second Form I-751 on the client’s behalf, in support of which the Firm provided evidence showing that the client was divorced but married in good faith, or in the alternative, that the client’s U.S. citizen husband had subjected her to extreme cruelty/battering during the marriage. Due to Cayer Dyson Law’s preparation of the case, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case after an interview.
A Portuguese mother and son qualified for immigration benefits under a prior amnesty law (section 245(i)) still in effect for certain individuals. Cayer Dyson Law prepared and submitted their cases to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which approved the cases after an interview.
A Zimbabwean recently married a U.S. citizen. Cayer Dyson Law prepared and submitted her case to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which approved the case after an interview.
A Cameroon citizen who was married to a U.S. citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law to represent her before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which had already denied her case once previously. Through Cayer Dyson Law’s aggressive representation, the client received her green card.
A citizen of Trinidad filed paperwork with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to remove the conditions on his permanent residence. Over two years passed without any final result to his case. After this client retained Cayer Dyson Law, the firm contacted the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to determine the status of the case. Within one week of Cayer Dyson Law's involvement on the case, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case.
Applicants for Green Cards under Special Legislative Programs
A Haitian citizen present in the United States for over 10 years applied for a green card under the Haitian Refugee and Immigrant Fairness Act ("HRIFA") without an attorney. After the case was denied on the basis of a prior criminal record, he retained Cayer Dyson Law. Through the perseverance of Cayer Dyson Law, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services agreed to reopen the case for the client to submit a waiver to overcome the criminal record. This case involved significant humanitarian factors, given that the client was fully disabled with serious medical problems. After an up-hill battle, the case was finally approved.

A Haitian citizen applied for a green card under the Haitian Refugee and Immigrant Fairness Act (“HRIFA”). Because he did not have a lawyer, the case was stalled in the immigration process for many years. Finally, due to Cayer Dyson Law’s involvement, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approved the case 7 years after the client had initially filed the application.

Aliens Applying for Visas at U.S. Consulates Abroad, Including Aliens Applying for Waivers of Grounds of Inadmissibility (Consular Processing)
An Albanian citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law to assist him with his immigrant visa case through his U.S. citizen mother who had filed a petition on his behalf. This client had two bars to the approval of his immigrant visa: (1) a 10-year bar for a prior removal order; and (2) a 10-year bar for unlawful presence and fraud. The client had obtained an I-212 approval for the prior removal order, but needed assistance with the I-601 waiver for fraud and unlawful presence. Cayer Dyson Law put together an I-601 waiver package that proved that his U.S. citizen parents would suffer extreme hardship if he were denied the visa, based on their medical conditions, which included severe back pain, and length of residence in the United States.

A Lebanese family retained Cayer Dyson Law on behalf of their adult daughter who was stranded in Lebanon after her immigrant visa and application for an I-601 waiver for unlawful presence in the United States for more than 10 years were denied. After reviewing the evidence submitted by the prior attorney, Cayer Dyson Law re-filed the I-601 waiver with additional evidence of hardship, and was also able to uncover significant medical evidence relating to the adult daughter and parents to bolster the claim of hardship to the U.S. citizen parents if the daughter were denied the waiver. Due to the country conditions in Lebanon, Cayer Dyson Law was also able to ask for and was granted expedited processing of the I-601 waiver. The family was overjoyed to eventually hear the news that the waiver had been granted. Without Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy and detail-oriented approach, the family would have been separated from each other for the next 10 years.

A U.S. citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law to handle the case of her husband, a Haitian citizen, who left the United States for Canada due to an outstanding order of removal. The client handled the first part of the process on her own but quickly realized that competent legal representation was necessary when the Consulate in Montreal, Canada denied the visa due to a 10-year bar for a removal order and her husband's unlawful presence of more than 1 year in the United States. At that point, she retained Cayer Dyson Law to prepare and file an I-601 waiver for unlawful presence and an I-212 application for the prior removal order. Cayer Dyson Law was able to successfully advocate that the U.S. citizen would suffer extreme hardship if her husband was refused admission to the United States, and that it would be impossible for them to be apart and/or to relocate to Haiti or Canada to be together. The couple had two U.S. citizen children together, one of whom had been diagnosed with developmental delay. When this family learned that their waiver was approved, they were overcome with joy as they had been living apart for almost 3 1/2 years waiting for the visa process to be completed. This family’s future has been changed forever due to Cayer Dyson Law’s dedication to this case.

A U.S. citizen sponsored her daughter for an immigrant visa in Nairobi, Kenya. In the middle of the process, tragically, the client learned that her daughter had contracted HIV which meant that she was "inadmissible" to the United States for health-related reasons. Cayer Dyson Law prepared an "HIV waiver" to overcome this ban. As a result of Cayer Dyson Law's successful advocacy, the waiver was approved and the daughter was issued an immigrant visa.

A U.S. citizen retained Cayer Dyson Law for assistance in obtaining the approval of a waiver to allow his Brazilian wife to re-enter the United States after a prior period of unlawful presence in the United States. The couple filed all the paperwork on their own through the U.S. Consulate in Naples, Italy, and were denied an immigrant visa due to the prior period of unlawful presence. At no time were they ever advised of their right to apply for a waiver to overcome the unlawful presence. After the couple retained Cayer Dyson Law, Cayer Dyson Law prepared and submitted an I-601 waiver package to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services offices in Rome, Italy. Due to Cayer Dyson Law's thorough preparation of the I-601 waiver package, the waiver application was approved. The client was thereafter issued an immigrant visa to enter the United States.

Cayer Dyson Law recently obtained the approval of an alien petition filed by a U.S. citizen with a U.S. Consulate abroad, for an Egyptian citizen with a criminal conviction and a prior order of deportation.
Applicants for Citizenship/Naturalization
A citizen of Ghana sought Cayer Dyson Law's assistance after his sister met Attorney Dyson in the waiting room of USCIS' Boston office by chance. The client's sister was unable to assist the client with his naturalization case, even after she sought the assistance of the local USCIS office and the immigration liaison at Senator Brown's office. The client's case was particularly sensitive because the client's two prior naturalization applications (filed several years before) were denied for lack of good moral character - the client had failed to disclose some arrests under a different name when he obtained his green card. Attorney Dyson advised her client to file again, given that some time had passed, and stayed by her client's side throughout a difficult interview. Both Attorney Dyson and her client were overjoyed when they finally received a notice that the client had been recommended for naturalization!
An El Salvadoran client sought Cayer Dyson Law's assistance after he attended a naturalization interview without an attorney, at which time the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services requested criminal records relating to a criminal history of which he was unaware. Obviously, the client was very distraught about the situation because the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services suggested that he had lied in connection with obtaining his green card and on his naturalization application, and requested that he provide the criminal records from the incident. The client could not remember the incident, despite the fact that it appeared on his FBI criminal history check. After retaining Cayer Dyson Law, Cayer Dyson Law investigated and found no court records pertaining to the incident. Cayer Dyson Law presented this evidence to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to overcome the information in the FBI criminal history check. Both Cayer Dyson Law and the client were delighted when the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services eventually agreed that the client had no criminal history, and deserved to become a U.S. citizen.
A Dominican client was referred to Cayer Dyson Law by a criminal attorney who was able to successfully defend the client against a drug trafficking charge. At the same time, the client had a pending naturalization application. Cayer Dyson Law was retained to represent the client at the naturalization interview. At the interview, the application was closely scrutinized because an applicant for naturalization must demonstrate "good moral character" for at least 5 years. Following the interview, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services asked the client for a copy of the police report to review the client's conduct leading to the arrest. Cayer Dyson Law successfully argued that the client's recent arrest for drug trafficking within the last year did not prevent the client from establishing good moral character for the requisite period. Fortunately, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services agreed, and approved the case.
Cayer Dyson Law assisted an undocumented Brazilian serving in the U.S. Army with obtaining citizenship under special military naturalization provisions.
A Ugandan retained Cayer Dyson Law after waiting for her citizenship for one year following her naturalization interview. After the firm contacted the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services regarding her case, the client’s naturalization application was approved.
Applicants for Green Card Renewals
A Nigerian retained Cayer Dyson Law after having unsuccessfully tried to renew his green card on his own for approximately one year. After Cayer Dyson Law took over the case, the client received his green card within several months.
A Mexican with prior criminal convictions retained Cayer Dyson Law for assistance in renewing his green card. After looking into his criminal history, Cayer Dyson Law determined that the client had some outstanding criminal issues. We sent him to a criminal attorney to resolve these issues before submitting his application to renew his green card. The client has now successfully received his green card.
Basic Case Assessments
A Dominican did not have any records of the applications which his green card holder wife had submitted to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on his behalf. Cayer Dyson Law obtained a copy of the immigration papers from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for the client.
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